St Margaret’s Road serves as the main feeder road to the new IKEA store in Dublin, where 500 new jobs have been created and which houses the largest shop floor in Ireland. Careys Building & Civil Engineering delivered extensive road diversion and realignment works in a live and busy environment, close to local businesses and public amenities, coordinating with the local authorities across different counties.

Phase 1A of St Margaret’s Road involved the construction of 1km of a new 45m wide dual carriageway with shared footpath cycleways. Our team also upgraded 2km of existing carriageway and footpaths, as well as constructing filter lanes and traffic signals for a new connection to the new St Margaret’s Road.

Service infrastructure was installed to serve the new ESB 110 KV Poppintree electrical substation and future sites adjacent the new roadways. A live dual carriageway was maintained during these works and we implemented a detailed traffic management plan which entailed having one lane open off-peak and two during peak periods in both directions. The scheme also included significant out of hours weekend and night-time work to minimise traffic disruption.

Phase 1B of the works consisted of an upgrade to 1200m of existing footways and cycleways, realignment of the local roads network and construction of new bus corridors. Our works were essential to improving the capacity of the local road system in advance of the increased traffic expected from a new IKEA development. This element of the project involved carriageway construction, foul sewer construction, storm water sewer construction, pond construction, and utilities installation.

Throughout the works, we maintained access to entrances for Northwood Park local businesses and local access roads, and the project involved close liaison with Dublin Bus, An Garda Siochana Traffic Corps and two local authorities as the project was on both sides of the border between Dublin City Council and Fingal County Council.

Client
Ballymun Regeneration Ltd
Location
Republic of Ireland
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